Category Archives: Latest News

Screening at the 10th OIFF “Odesa Film Festival”. 11-22July

A Moon for My Father by Mania Akbari, Douglas White at the 10th OIFF “Odesa Film Festival” in Special screening with the films Varda by Agnès by Agns Varda, Process / The Trial by Sergey Loznitsa , Soundtrack for a Revolution by Bill Guttentag, Loves of a blonde by Milo Forman, From Ukraine to Hollywood by Stanislav Suknenko, The Vice of Hope by Edoardo De Angelis, The Fifth Season by Peter Brosens, Jessica Woodworth, Putin’s Witnesses by Vitaly Mansky / Latvia, Switzerland, Jimmy’s Hall / Jimmy’s Hall by Ken Loach, Birds Are Singing in Kigali by Joanna Kos-Krauze.
Mania Akbari collaborates with British sculptor Douglas White to coin a tender fusion of language, where a meeting of cinema and sculpture investigates the processes of physical and psychological destruction and renewal. As she undergoes various surgeries on a body decimated by cancer, her bodys history engages in a conversation of how bodies are traumatized, censored, and politicized, and yet ultimately remain a site of possibility.

Screening at ICA LONDON 22 Jun 2019

Screening at ICA LONDON 22 Jun 2019,This screening will be followed by a discussion with filmmakers Mania Akbari and Douglas White, hosted by writer and creative director of Modern Forms, Nick Hackworth.
Written and directed by London-based Iranian filmmaker Mania Akbari and her partner, the British sculptor Douglas White, A Moon For My Father (2018) considers the mysterious connections between death and loss, memory, love, family ties, the body, birth and artistic creation.The film takes an epistolary form, drawing on several years of written correspondence between Akbari and White. Deftly interwoven alongside the letters are family photos, archival footage from Iran, imagery from White’s artwork, and scenes of the couple’s everyday life together. As Akbari undergoes surgeries on a body decimated by cancer, remembrance and reconstruction provide a framework for investigating how bodies are traumatised, censored and politicised, and yet ultimately remain a site of possibility.
https://www.ica.art/films/a-moon-for-my-father-q-a?fbclid=IwAR2WZc0BVXZ1xLJn4mdinLOn-mUCJYyIbjgOZ0mnbzfeHzx6TSvwNW0kIZ0

Screening at ICA London 15-19 Jun 2019

Screening at ICA London, 15-19 Jun 2019,

Written and directed by London-based Iranian filmmaker Mania Akbari and her partner, the British sculptor Douglas White, A Moon For My Father (2018) considers the mysterious connections between death and loss, memory, love, family ties, the body, birth and artistic creation. The film takes an epistolary form, drawing on several years of written correspondence between Akbari and White. Deftly interwoven alongside the letters are family photos, archival footage from Iran, imagery from White’s artwork, and scenes of the couple’s everyday life together. As Akbari undergoes surgeries on a body decimated by cancer, remembrance and reconstruction provide a framework for investigating how bodies are traumatised, censored and politicised, and yet ultimately remain a site of possibility.
06:30 pmSat, 15 Jun 2019 CINEMA 1
02:40 pmSun, 16 Jun 2019 CINEMA 1
04:40 pmTue, 18 Jun 2019 CINEMA 1
06:45 pmWed, 19 Jun 2019 CINEMA 1
https://www.ica.art/films/a-moon-for-my-father?fbclid=IwAR1r37H6qNA5Oj_OHQRl7kean137HDp7AlY3RsNwdeeTJL83RWHutRdCvpU

Screening at Barbican-London + ScreenTalk

A meeting of cinema and sculpture investigates remembrance and reconstruction, putting the trauma of the body in conversation with collective memory.Written and directed by London-based Iranian filmmaker Mania Akbari and her partner, British sculptor Douglas White, A Moon For My Father weaves a poetic tapestry from years of written and filmed correspondence between the pair. Family photographs, archival footage and imagery from White’s artwork intermix with documentary footage from Mania’s journey through cancer and pregnancy, connecting images and ideas in a dream-associative logic. Mixing the personal with the political through the visceral and conceptual engagement with the body, the film is an uncompromising, intimate work of artistic expression.

To follow, Mania and Douglas will be in conversation with Peter Bradshaw.

https://www.barbican.org.uk/whats-on/2019/event/a-moon-for-my-father-15-screentalk?fbclid=IwAR1eC8qivvUpJFGO_LpSeO6UH0TwgAsD2YNWpSUeFj_T2yuOtwIEIrFNvl8

“FIPRESCI International Critics Award 2019 ” for A Moon for My Father.

“FIPRESCI International Critics Award 2019 ” for
A Moon for My Father.

Our winning film is both intimate and bold. We meet two artists who sculpt their work around death. One feels that she is carrying death in her body, the other is mourning the death of a parent. But together they sculpt life in a miraculous way. The film is brave and never pitiful, though the battle at times is daring. It is a visual, poetic diary, put into a larger socio-politic context, making it a multilayered documentary. “FIPRESCI International Critics Award 2019 ” goes to A Moon for My Father by Mania Akbari and Douglas White.
Juris: Kristian Aalen, Meena Karnik, Sarah Skoric,

Screening at 59th Krakow Film Festival

dir. Mania Akbari, Douglas White | United Kingdom, Iran | documentary | 2019 |
An intimate documentary where a story about corporeality is interlaced with traumatic experiences from the past. Film letters of the director and her partner are intertwined with medical documentation, family photographs or takes from the underground. What seems to be an accidental collage is a coherent artistic expression of a contemporary woman.
https://www.krakowfilmfestival.pl/en/59th-kff/films/?fbclid=IwAR0_DFHDWYMVdymfVR4zRVO8cuz1nrsbNTPprscXGtq49Eop8TEPoPKabD8

Screening at Art Centre in International Flying Broom Women’s Film Festival

An intimate documentary where a story about corporeality is interlaced with traumatic experiences from the past. Film letters of the director and her partner are intertwined with medical documentation, family photographs or takes from the underground. What seems to be an accidental collage is a coherent artistic expression of a contemporary woman.

Prior to seeing A Moon for my Father, I was uncertain of what to expect from the combination of sculpture and cinema, or sculpture in cinema. But this dialogue turns out to be incredibly productive and successful. The film insists on the materiality of things and of bodies, and confronts the viewer with the brutishness of physical processes, without sentimentality and without allowing familiar narratives (of heroism/melancholy/tragedy/triumph-over-adversity) to mediate or soften bodily facts. I loved the move from human tissue to milky latex, to palm trees, to the exhumation of an ants’ nest, the discovery of a fruit bat’s corpse, of an elephant’s skin, to the impossibility of smashing open a safe with an axe — and the way paying attention to the mute testimony of such objects speaks to processes of transformation, of decay, of death and of life itself. In the film, objects and materials also link to memories of Iran. Not only to girlish memories of childhood loves, but also to the collective memory of so many damaged, mutilated bodies produced by the decimation of the Iran-Iraq war, and the invitation to consider how those wounds, like the filmmaker’s, may be made visible and may be worn with pride. Finally, after following various tangents and digressions along the way, the circularity of the film brings about another kind of revolution. The artifice of sculptural and surgical reconstruction, by turns objectifying and dehumanising, improbably makes way for the miraculous appearance of new life. By Miranda Pennell
https://www.biletinial.com/sinema/ben-bedenim-ulkem

A Moon for My Father review – a poetic meditation on body and beauty. By Peter Bradshaw,

Mania Akbari reaches for the sublime with a dreamlike film that tries to join the dots between past and present.This is a deeply intimate, personal and moving work from the Iranian film-maker Mania Akbari, whose movies have often been meditations on beauty and body image. (As an actor, she is also known for starring in Abbas Kiarostami’s film Ten.) Akbari has made this in collaboration with her partner, the artist and sculptor Douglas White, and the result is a form of digressive-poetic cinema, connecting images and ideas in a dream-associative logic.

It is loosely structured around the idea of letters written between Akbari and White, alternating voiceovers as they muse on how what is happening to them to now relates to their family and childhood. Akbari speaks in (subtitled) Farsi on these occasions, but in English to everyone else. The film opens with material shot about five years ago: a very candid scene of Akbari being photographed in a hospital suite after a double mastectomy; as the months and years go by, she will prepare not merely for reconstructive surgery but for her ovaries to be removed to pre-empt a recurrence of cancer, and also to have IVF treatment.
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/mar/21/a-moon-for-my-father-review-mania-akbari